Now Shipping DVDs

We are excited to be able to release part of this documentary project to DVD and digital this month.  We are already shipping The Amish and the Reformation DVDs to all those who pre-ordered.  Here is my Mom with a few copies of the DVD. You can see all the available ways of watching The Amish and the Reformation on our Where to Watch page. We are beginning to get feedback from people who are watching the first copies of the DVD.  Here is a photo and status that my sister Ruth posted on her Facebook page: Just finished previewing “The Amish and the Reformation” the documentary my brother made for the 500 anniversary year of Martin Luther nailing the 95 Theses on the Wittenburg Castle door. If you’re interested in the Reformation and especially how it relates to the Amish you should watch it! I thought it was interesting and I don’t normally like documentaries but then again I’m probably biased. 😛 After all it is a part of the history of my people. And I think my brother does a great job of narrating.  – Ruth Graber   The rest of the series will be released later.  Stay connected and we will let you know as soon as possible how you can see all of Breaking the...

2016 Update

Many of you have been asking when our film project will be coming out. Good question! Originally we thought we would release in 2015, but that was before we expanded the project from a feature length documentary into a six part series. Here is 2016 update for Breaking the Silence Breaking the Silence 2016 Update from My Amish Story on Vimeo. Yes, we decided to change the project into six made for TV episodes. Our goal is to air it on TV and to release on DVD. We are excited to announce that we will be releasing this film project in 2017, the five hundred year anniversary of the Reformation! We will keep you posted with where to see it and release dates. Until then, we are busy putting the final touches on each episode. Blessings!...
The Grossmünster

The Grossmünster

One of the first places we visited in Switzerland was Zurich. Although Zurich has a lot of attractions for the average visitor; we were interested in the religious history of the place. The Anabaptist heritage to some degree is rooted here in Zurich and especially in the Grossmünster.  Huldrych Zwingli (1484-1531) was a leader of the reformation in Switzerland. In 1518 he became pastor of the Grossmünster and began preaching on ideas of reforming the Catholic church. By 1525 he had replaced the Catholic Mass with a new communion liturgy.  It was along this time that some of his parishioners broke away from him and formed what would be know as the Anabaptists today. The Grossmünster or “Great Minister” or “Great Cathedral” is a very interesting building. Construction was started around 1100 and it was inaugurated around 1220. It was built on the site of an earlier church that had been commissioned by Charlemagne.  It is built on the banks of the Limmat River and it is distinguished by its twin towers. I wanted to show you more pictures of the Grossmünster and Zurich and the area where it is.   Here you can see the Grossmünster from the Rathaus Bridge over the Limmat River. The Rathaus is the building on the foreground left; built partially over the river and the Rathaus Bridge is part of that construction.       When you look at the larger version of either picture by clicking on it, you can get a better view of the double wide doors and the panels that are part of it.  There is a lot of history...
Art or Not — We Observe Art in Zurich

Art or Not — We Observe Art in Zurich

The scene here is along the Limmat River. This is the other side of the river as seen from the side where the plaque is that commemorates the drownings of early Anabaptist reformers. And the Grossmunster is in the background on the right.   But I wanted to show you some art. Yes.  The crane. The crane is a work of art on loan from the German government. I had seen the crane when we first arrived at the river, as seen from this photo. I could envision a day and time when the crane was used to unload freight from barges that had come down the river from Lake Zurich which is just ahead in this photo.  And it was still there, a part of history, a part of the story of Zurich. I asked someone about the crane. They got a funny look and called it, “Oh, that controversial piece of art. It has sparked a lot of conversation.”   It is on loan from the German government. It had been a working crane for over 50 years in Rostock in Germany. Artist and writer Jan Morganthaler said, “The crane is meant to bring a feeling of the sea – and a sense of freedom – to landlocked Zurich.” Follow this link  to read more about it....
Correction to Castle Trachselwald Post

Correction to Castle Trachselwald Post

I felt it was important enough to draw attention to this fact about Castle Trachselwald. I had said and thought I was correct for most of our trip since visiting Castle Trachselwald that it was also the home of people living there.  Although that may have been the case at one time, it is not true today. The board that oversees the castle have hopes to turn most of it into a museum. Currently the courtyard and prison tower and the grounds are open to the public daily but the rest is locked.  I am looking forward to going back one day and visiting when the whole castle is open to the...
We Visit Mont-Prevoir

We Visit Mont-Prevoir

As you drive up the long driveway in the Jura Mountains in southern France up to the Graber Ancestral home at Mont-Prevoir; this is your first view. It is also the view that my uncle Ora Graber had put in his book, The Graber Immigrants 1650-1984. The place is currently a working dairy farm. The house is on the left and the barn right past it. On the left you can see an older building which is the first house Peter Graber(1745-1805) had built when he moved to this farm on the top of the mountain which he called Mont-Prevoir. In the photo you can see two of the current residents children; Leanna and Noah. Not sure of the spelling as this is in France and I am not good with French. A Graber cousin Stefan Graber was our guide and he was our interpreter.  When I showed the current owner and his children the book and the pictures in it, they were excited. They had no idea their farm was that famous.  They did, however say, that a few years ago some Amish people visited there but they had no idea what they wanted or why they came. Joseph wrote an earlier post about this area and posted some of the pictures from the Graber book. Read that here. This is a closeup of the front side of the house Peter Graber built when he first moved his family from Audincourt to Mont-Prevoir. The present owner said there used to be another room on this end of the house but it was bad and had been removed. There...